오늘도배운다The Truth About Customer Experience

The Truth About Customer Experience

-

- Advertisment -spot_img

Companies have long emphasized touchpoints—the many critical moments when customers interact with the organization and its offerings on their way to purchase and after. But the narrow focus on maximizing satisfaction at those moments can create a distorted picture, suggesting that customers are happier with the company than they actually are. It also diverts attention from the bigger—and more important—picture: the customer’s end-to-end journey.

Think about a routine service event—say, a product query—from the point of view of both the company and the customer. The company may receive millions of phone calls about the product and must handle each one well. But if asked about the experience months after the fact, a customer would never describe such a call as simply a “product question.” Understanding the context of a call is key. A customer might have been trying to ensure uninterrupted service after moving, make sense of the renewal options at the end of a contract, or fix a nagging technical problem. A company that manages complete journeys would not only do its best with the individual transaction but also seek to understand the broader reasons for the call, address the root causes, and create feedback loops to continuously improve interactions upstream and downstream from the call.

 

In our research and consulting on customer journeys, we’ve found that organizations able to skillfully manage the entire experience reap enormous rewards: enhanced customer satisfaction, reduced churn, increased revenue, and greater employee satisfaction. They also discover more-effective ways to collaborate across functions and levels, a process that delivers gains throughout the company.

 

Consider a leading pay TV provider we worked with. Although it was among the best in the industry at managing churn, it faced a maturing market, heightened competition, and escalating costs to keep its best customers. Churn was a familiar problem, of course, and the typical reasons for it were well understood: Pricing spurred some customers to leave, while competitors’ technology or product bundles lured others away. The common ways to keep customers were also well known, but they were expensive, including such things as upgrade offers, discounted rate plans, and “save desks” to intercept defectors. So the executives looked to another lever—customer experience—to see if improvements there could reduce churn and build competitive advantage.

As they dug in, they discovered that the firm’s emphasis on perfecting touchpoints wasn’t enough. The company had long been disciplined about measuring customers’ satisfaction with each transaction involving the call centers, field services, and the website, and scores were consistently high. But focus groups revealed that many customers were unhappy with their overall interaction. Looking solely at individual transactions made it hard for the firm to identify where to direct improvement efforts, and the high levels of satisfaction on specific metrics made it hard to motivate employees to change.

 

As company leaders dug further, they uncovered the root of the problem. Most customers weren’t fed up with any one phone call, field visit, or other interaction—in fact, they didn’t much care about those singular touchpoints. What reduced satisfaction was something few companies manage—cumulative experiences across multiple touchpoints and in multiple channels over time.

 

Take new-customer onboarding, a journey that typically spans about three months and involves six or so phone calls, a home visit from a technician, and numerous web and mail exchanges. Each interaction with this provider had a high likelihood of going well. But in key customer segments, average satisfaction fell almost 40% over the course of the journey. It wasn’t the touchpoints that needed to be improved—it was the onboarding process as a whole. Most service encounters were positive in a narrow sense—employees resolved the issues at hand—but the underlying problems were avoidable, the fundamental causes went unaddressed, and the cumulative effect on the customer was decidedly negative.

 

Remedying matters would add significant value, but it wouldn’t be easy: The company needed a whole new way of managing its service operations in order to reinvent the customer journeys that mattered most.

회신을 남겨주세요

귀하의 의견을 입력하십시오!
여기에 이름을 입력하십시오.

2 + 12 =

Latest news

신입 사원이 들어온 후 더 바빠짐

신입사원이 들어오고 매우 바빠졌다. 갓 대졸이라 기초부터 모든 것을 가르쳐야 되는데 우리같은 좋좋소에서는 근로기준법에 따라 근무 시간내 교육이 불가능하다....

22-23 아이언윙 수영 교실 시작!

아이언윙 수영 교실이 시작되었다. 내가 잘하는 것과 타인을 가르치는 것은 다름을 또 깨닫는다. 골프 배울 때 경험으로는 동작의 큰...

스쿠터 이제 안녕.

15년간 서울에서 시간 약속을 잘 지킬 수 있게 해준 스쿠터에서 이제 내려오기로 했다. 2007년 발리 여행을 갔을 때 렌탈로...

운동 목적으로 구입한 어메이즈핏 GTR 4

공돌이파파 유튜브에서 어메이즈핏 GTR 4 배터리가 일주일 넘게 간다는 리뷰를 보고 구입했다. 4년 정도 사용한 어메이즈핏이 오래되서 앱이나 스트라바...
- Advertisement -spot_imgspot_img

교보문고

대학 신입생때 학교 도서관은 현실 도피처였다. 현실은 춥고 힘든 곳이었는데 도서관에서 책을 보면 다른 세계로 들어갈 수 있었기 때문이다. 당시에는 스마트폰이나...

이건 건망증은 아닌데…

이건 건망증은 아니다. 분명히 락커키를 반납하고 왔다. 락커키를 반납해야 회원카드를 돌려받기 때문이다. 그런데 왜 락커키가 수영가방안에 들어있는 것일까? 요즘...

Must read

신입 사원이 들어온 후 더 바빠짐

신입사원이 들어오고 매우 바빠졌다. 갓 대졸이라 기초부터 모든 것을...

22-23 아이언윙 수영 교실 시작!

아이언윙 수영 교실이 시작되었다. 내가 잘하는 것과 타인을 가르치는...
- Advertisement -spot_imgspot_img

You might also likeRELATED
Recommended to you